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Early intervention games : fun, joyful ways to develop social and motor skills in children with autism spectrum or sensory processing disorders / Barbara Sher ; illustrations by Ralph Butler.

By: Sher, Barbara
Material type: TextTextPublisher: San Francisco, CA : Jossey-Bass, c2009Edition: 1st edDescription: xiv, 235 p. : ill. ; 24 cmISBN: 9780470391266 (pbk.) :; 047039126X (pbk.)Subject(s): Early years | Childhood | Early diagnosis and intervention | Sensory issues | Social and imaginative play | Motor skills | Occupational Therapy (OT) | Social skills | School and learningSummary: "Barbara Sher, an expert occupational therapist and teacher, has written a handy resource filled with games to play with young children who have Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or other sensory processing disorders (SPD). The games are designed to help children feel comfortable in social situations and teach other basic lessons including beginning and end, spatial relationships, hand-eye coordination, and more. Games can also be used in regular classrooms to encourage inclusion."
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book AIDE Canada Main Library
12:02.a SHER.e 2009 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 100162
Book Book AIDE Canada Main Library
12:02.a SHER.e 2009 (Browse shelf) 2 Checked out 09/23/2021 101752
Book Book AIDE Canada Main Library
12:02.a SHER.e 2009 (Browse shelf) 3 Available 101912

"Barbara Sher, an expert occupational therapist and teacher, has written a handy resource filled with games to play with young children who have Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or other sensory processing disorders (SPD). The games are designed to help children feel comfortable in social situations and teach other basic lessons including beginning and end, spatial relationships, hand-eye coordination, and more. Games can also be used in regular classrooms to encourage inclusion."