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We walk : life with severe autism / Amy S. F. Lutz.

By: Lutz, Amy S. F
Material type: TextTextSeries: The culture and politics of health care workDescription: 200 pages ; 23 cmISBN: 9781501751394Subject(s): Across the lifespan | Books by parents | Communicating with people who have significant developmental disabilities | Developmental Disabilities (DD) | Disability rights and the neurodiversity movement | Essay collections | Parent-led advocacy | Resources for parents | Understanding autismSummary: "In this collection of beautiful and raw essays, Amy S. F. Lutz writes openly about her experience―the positive and the negative―as a mother of a now twenty-one-year-old son with severe autism. Lutz's human emotion drives through each page and challenges commonly held ideas that define autism either as a disease or as neurodiversity. We Walk is inspired by her own questions: What is the place of intellectually and developmentally disabled people in society? What responsibilities do we, as citizens and human beings, have to one another? Who should decide for those who cannot decide for themselves? What is the meaning of religion to someone with no abstract language? Exploring these questions, We Walk directly―and humanly―examines social issues such as inclusion, religion, therapeutics, and friendship through the lens of severe autism. In a world where public perception of autism is largely shaped by the "quirky geniuses" featured on television shows like The Big Bang Theory and The Good Doctor, We Walk demands that we center our debates about this disorder on those who are most affected by its impacts."
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book AIDE Canada Main Library
01:01.a LUTZ.a 2020 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 102523

"In this collection of beautiful and raw essays, Amy S. F. Lutz writes openly about her experience―the positive and the negative―as a mother of a now twenty-one-year-old son with severe autism. Lutz's human emotion drives through each page and challenges commonly held ideas that define autism either as a disease or as neurodiversity. We Walk is inspired by her own questions: What is the place of intellectually and developmentally disabled people in society? What responsibilities do we, as citizens and human beings, have to one another? Who should decide for those who cannot decide for themselves? What is the meaning of religion to someone with no abstract language? Exploring these questions, We Walk directly―and humanly―examines social issues such as inclusion, religion, therapeutics, and friendship through the lens of severe autism.

In a world where public perception of autism is largely shaped by the "quirky geniuses" featured on television shows like The Big Bang Theory and The Good Doctor, We Walk demands that we center our debates about this disorder on those who are most affected by its impacts."