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The parents' guide to teaching kids with Asperger syndrome and similar ASDs real-life skills for independence / Patricia Romanowski Bashe ; foreword by Peter Gerhardt.

By: Bashe, Patricia Romanowski
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Three Rivers Press, c2011Edition: 1st edDescription: xii, 384 p. : ill. ; 24 cmISBN: 9780307588951 (pbk.); 9780307588968 (ebk.)Subject(s): Childhood | Books by parents | Asperger’s syndrome | Independent living | Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) | Basic life skills | Social skills | Transition to adulthood | Resources for parents | Motivation | Mental healthSummary: "A parent's guide to give kids with Asperger Syndrome the skills that will make them feel as smart as they truly are"--Summary: "This is the book parents need to learn how to teach the "independence curriculum" to children with Asperger Syndrome at home. Success--in school, at home, on the playground, and beyond--depends on mastering countless basic living skills most kids just "pick up" almost by osmosis. Yet research shows that even children with ASDs who have high IQs often fall behind in meeting age-appropriate expectations when it comes to self-care, doing chores, and managing their time"--
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Sinneave Family Foundation
09:00.a BASH.c 2011 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 101036

"A parent's guide to give kids with Asperger Syndrome the skills that will make them feel as smart as they truly are"--

"This is the book parents need to learn how to teach the "independence curriculum" to children with Asperger Syndrome at home. Success--in school, at home, on the playground, and beyond--depends on mastering countless basic living skills most kids just "pick up" almost by osmosis. Yet research shows that even children with ASDs who have high IQs often fall behind in meeting age-appropriate expectations when it comes to self-care, doing chores, and managing their time"--