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Let me hear your voice : a family's triumph over autism / Catherine Maurice.

By: Maurice, Catherine
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Fawcett Columbine, 1994Edition: 1st Ballantine books edDescription: xx, 371 p. ; 21 cmISBN: 0449906647Subject(s): Childhood | Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) | Biographies | Books by parentsSummary: "She was a beautiful doelike child, with an intense, graceful fragility. In her first year, she picked up words, smiled and laughed, and learned to walk. But then Anne-Marie began to turn inward. And when her little girl lost some of the words she had acquired, cried inconsolably, and showed no interest in anyone around her, Catherine Maurice took her to doctors who gave her a devastating diagnosis: autism. In their desperate struggle to save their daughter, the Maurices plunged into a medical nightmare of false hopes, "miracle cures," and infuriating suggestions that Anne-Marie's autism was somehow their fault. Finally, Anne-Marie was saved by an intensive behavioral therapy."
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book AIDE Canada Main Library
02:02.a MAUR.c 1994 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 101173

Includes index.

"She was a beautiful doelike child, with an intense, graceful fragility. In her first year, she picked up words, smiled and laughed, and learned to walk. But then Anne-Marie began to turn inward. And when her little girl lost some of the words she had acquired, cried inconsolably, and showed no interest in anyone around her, Catherine Maurice took her to doctors who gave her a devastating diagnosis: autism.
In their desperate struggle to save their daughter, the Maurices plunged into a medical nightmare of false hopes, "miracle cures," and infuriating suggestions that Anne-Marie's autism was somehow their fault. Finally, Anne-Marie was saved by an intensive behavioral therapy."